5 Star
.
.

Juul’s team tried it in a group of 20 patients. Nine got poop transplants at the first sign of C. diff-related diarrhea, and 11 got the antibiotic metronidazole.

Five out of nine who got the fecal transplant were cured by a single transplant delivered by enema, and five of the 11 who got antibiotics were cured, the team reported. Their findings are being presented and discussed at a meeting of gastroenterologists called Digestive Disease Week.

Four days after the fecal transplant, three of the patients who still had diarrhea got antibiotics and two of them were cured. But giving more antibiotics to the six patients who got drugs to start with did not help them recover, the researchers said.

.
Mindfulness-based intervention improves parenting, suggests study
. . .
http://game-rapidshare.com/Buddle-neighbour-of-Burgdorf-from-Biosca?Begoniagr=214
.
.
.

However,  this also shows the inequities that remain in cancer care. Women in less economically developed countries, where costly vaccination and screening programmes are less common, are four times more likely to develop cervical cancer and it is the biggest cancer killer in these regions.

“Ensuring universal access to health care is a vital prerequisite for early detection and cancer treatment,” said Dr Fitzmaurice. “Improving access to advanced diagnostic technologies not commonly available in low-SDI countries is a critical step towards achieving health equity globally.”

While wealthier nations with longer life expectancy and national screening programmes top the rankings for new diagnoses, it is developing countries where there are the most cancer deaths.

.
.
.
.
.