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Anna, pictured with husband Michael and Lauren, consulted her GP for advice, but said she did not get many answers at first

She had to wear pads almost around the clock – even then having accidents, when urine would leak through her clothes.

For 18 long months, she was left feeling “upset and embarrassed” about her problem.

A urologist diagnosed her prolapse which, according to the NHS, happens when one or more of the organs in the pelvis – be that the uterus, bowel or bladder – slip from their normal position and bulge into the vagina.

While not life-threatening, it can be incredibly uncomfortable, and symptoms include a feeling of heaviness in the tummy, feeling or seeing a lump or bulge, problems with weeing and discomfort during sex.

On top of this, Anna also has diastasis – where the two muscles running down the middle of her stomach separated – meaning she still looked pregnant months after giving birth.

Thankfully, both conditions improved after she began working with pelvic floor physiotherapist Emma Brockwell, having sessions once a month.

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Their carefully cultivated and curated samples cured half the patients who tried them right away, the Norwegian team reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.

And most of those that weren’t cured with a single transplant saw their diarrhea clear up when they were given antibiotics later.

“This was a small trial, but the results suggest that fecal microbiota transplantation may be an alternative to antibiotic therapy in primary C. difficile infection,” Dr. Frederick Juul of Oslo University Hospital and colleagues wrote in a letter to the New England Journal.

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