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(KUTV) - The John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah reported Saturday that it will be notifying 607 patients of a potential disclosure of some of their information following a theft of electronic equipment.

A laptop computer and external storage device (used to take and store retinal images) were stolen from a locked storage unite at 65 Mario Capecchi Drive in Salt Lake City. The eye center learned about this theft on April 3, 2018.

The devices contained retinal images, full or partial name and dates of birth for patients and medical reference numbers for 602 infants and 5 adults, all of whom had images taken by Moran specialists conducting evaluations at the University of Utah Hospital and Primary Children's Hospital between July 1, 2014 and March 30, 2018.

No social security numbers or financials records were stored on either device. This investigation is still ongoing.

"As part of University of Utah Health, the John A. Moran Eye Center is fully committed to protecting the privacy of our patients," Randall J. Olson, CEO of the John A. Moran Eye Center, said in a statement. "I sincerely regret that personal information about any of our patients is ever exposed and especially so for children. While no financial information was disclosed, I understand the concerns that impacted patients and parents may have. For peace of mind, we are offering free credit monitoring for any child or adult whose data may have been compromised."

The Moran Eye Center is working to improve its policy and procedures and enhance security measures to reduce the risk of an event like this from happening again.

"Patient trust is fundamental to everything we do at the Moran Eye Center, and our team is conducting a comprehensive review of our policies, procedures, and security measures to ensure patient information is always protected," Olson said.

Impacted patients and parents or guardians will receive letters by U.S. mail. If you are an impacted individuals and you would like to ask a question about this situation, please call 855-349-6456 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. MDT Monday through Friday.




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Diets that sound too good to be true are often just that. But a plan called intermittent fasting that frees its followers from calorie counting and carb cutting is quickly gaining traction in Silicon Valley. Scientific research suggests its followers are onto something big.

Popularized by Bay Area health nuts who don't mind being guinea pigs for science, intermittent fasting (or simply "IF" among fans), involves limiting the time you eat to a specific time period each day. While most of us snack somewhat regularly from the time we wake up until the time we go to sleep, intermittent fasters only "feed" within a strictly defined window, often from morning to afternoon or afternoon to evening.

Silicon Valley loves it. One Bay Area group of enthusiasts called WeFast meets weekly to collectively break their fasts with a hearty morning meal. Facebook executive Dan Zigmond confines his eating to the narrow time slot of 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and many other CEOs and tech pioneers are sworn "IF" devotees.

Despite not requiring followers to count calories, ban carbs, or restrict their eating to celery and juice, intermittent fasting has been shown to be just as helpful for weight loss as traditional diets. And animal studies hint that the plan could have a range of other health benefits from curbing cancer risk to even prolonging life.

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