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But after taking into account other factors -- such as site of the cancer and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels -- the researchers found that black men had a 19 percent lower risk of dying during the study period than white men.

"By pooling data across clinical trials, this study provided a unique opportunity to evaluate how race might affect prostate cancer response to treatment," said lead study author Susan Halabi, a professor of biostatistics and bioinformatics at Duke University.

Earlier studies found that black men with advanced prostate cancer who received treatment died sooner than white men, but the evidence has been inconsistent, the researchers noted.

"This study underscores the importance of increasing the participation of racial minorities in clinical trials. Every patient who participates in a clinical trial contributes to improving care, and all patients should have the opportunity to receive needed therapies," she said in an American Society of Clinical Oncology, or ASCO, news release.

Black men have a 60 percent higher rate of getting prostate cancer. In addition, they are more likely to be diagnosed at a younger age and with advanced, aggressive cancer, the researchers said.

Because black men had more problems that could limit their survival, such as higher PSA levels and worse measures of general well-being, the researchers compared outcomes in black men to white men using the same prognostic factors.

According to ASCO expert Dr. Robert Dreicer, "This study adds to the growing body of evidence showing that black men with advanced prostate cancer who participate in clinical trials have the same, if not better, chances of survival as white men."

In addition, he said, "This research shows that by providing equal access to treatment, we can reduce racial disparities in outcomes for men with advanced prostate cancer."

The findings were to be presented Friday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, in Chicago. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

Visit the American Cancer Society for more on prostate cancer.

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Doctors had been focusing the chemo on the lungs instead of the brain, and it was the brain tumor — which looked like a partially-inflated balloon filled with water — that caused the seizure. At the end of September 2015, Fred had surgery to remove the brain tumor.

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But Lampson also changed in good ways. He finished treatment in February 2008, though he considers his first clean scan on Sept. 24, 2007, as his official cancer-free date. He said beating cancer gave him the focus and drive needed to become a professional goalkeeper.

“I matured incredibly quickly, found out what my priorities were, my values in life, my morals in life, at 18 years old,” Lampson said. “It made me a much better person because of that.”

Springing into action

By June 2008, Lampson was training with the Columbus Crew academy, working to regain his fitness and stamina after gaining 80 pounds during treatment. Still dealing with medical complications his first season at Northern Illinois, he transferred to Ohio State. Columbus signed him as a homegrown player ahead of the 2012 MLS season.

During that rookie year, the mom of one of Lampson’s close friends from high school died of to leukemia, making him realize this illness didn’t just affect him.

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